What is difference between DoS vs DDoS attacks?

In a Denial of Service (DoS) attack, a hacker uses a single Internet connection to either exploit a software vulnerability or flood a target with fake requests—usually in an attempt to exhaust server resources (e.g., RAM and CPU).

On the other hand, Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks are launched from multiple connected devices that are distributed across the Internet. These multi-person, multi-device barrages are generally harder to deflect, mostly due to the sheer volume of devices involved. Unlike single-source DoS attacks, DDoS assaults tend to target the network infrastructure in an attempt to saturate it with huge volumes of traffic.

DDoS attacks also differ in the manner of their execution. Broadly speaking, DoS attacks are launched using homebrewed scripts or DoS tools (e.g., Low Orbit Ion Canon), while DDoS attacks are launched from botnets—large clusters of connected devices (e.g., cellphones, PCs or routers) infected with malware that allows remote control by an attacker.